Acta Via Serica

Journal for Silk Road and
Central Asian Studies

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Original Articles Home > Acta Via Serica > Archives > Original Articles
Title CONNECTING EURASIA AND THE AMERICAS: EXTENSION OF THE HISTORICAL SILK ROAD AND ITS GEOPOLITICAL IMPLICATIONS
Author CAGRI ERDEM
Volume Vol. 2 No. 2
Pages pp. 133~162 (all 30 pages)
Publication Date December, 2017
Keyword Globalization, geopolitics, Russian Far East, Siberia, Eurasia, economic
Abstract The Bering Strait crossing would link the entirety of Eurasia to the entirety of the Americas, and it can be seen as a natural extension of the historical Silk Road. There are some immense geopolitical benefits to such a project. It would bring about a profound and lasting change to the global economic and political outlook. The most valued function of the Bering Strait crossing and the extension of the associated railroad network would be to release the massive natural resources trapped underneath the tundra and permafrost for the benefit of Russia and the world. Moreover, the railroad project(s) would also build development corridors in those underdeveloped parts of the Russian Federation. The development of the resources and their rapid transportation to the global markets would contribute not only to the overall development of the region but also would be valuable for the resource-poor countries of Northeast Asia such as Japan, Korea, and China (relative to its economic size). This paper will explore the possible impact(s) of the Bering Strait crossing as a formidable infrastructure project for the economic development of the Russian Far East (RFE) from the Russian perspective under the frame of geopolitics.Furthermore, it will equally scrutinize the implications for the adjacent countries in the region.
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