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Original Articles Home > Acta Via Serica > Archives > Original Articles
Title WHEN SHAKESPEARE TRAVELS ALONG THE SILK ROAD: TARDID, AN IRANIAN ADAPTATION OF HAMLET
Author A. GHANDEHARION, B. HEYDARI JAGHARGH , and M. R. GHORBAN SABBAGH
Volume Vol. 2 No. 1
Pages pp. 65~84 (all 20 pages)
Publication Date June, 2017
Keyword Tardid [Doubt], Hamlet, movie adaptation, Iranian cinema, Silk Road, Varuzh Karim-Masihi, William Shakespeare
Abstract Media has become an inseparable companion of 21st century culture, exerting immense influence on our daily lives. This article aims to reveal how cultural aspects and media in a particular part of the Silk Road have adapted Western cannons. Iran has redefined and transformed Western culture through the modern Silk Road by the method of cinematic adaptation. Karim-Masihi employs the general plot of Hamlet, the well-known drama by William Shakespeare (1564-1616), in his movie Tardid (Doubt 2009); however, he transforms some of the characters to reflect the current socio-cultural aspects of Iranian society. One of the characters is named Siavash, whose life is similar to Hamlet. In passivity, he awaits his imminent death and other tragic consequences. Yet, the movie ends differently. It is not an Elizabethan tragedy in a strict sense, although the final scenes abound with corpses. This article aims to find the similarities and differences between the two works, while reasoning the significance of the alterations. It concludes with how different cultures react to the same themes.
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