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Original Articles Home > Acta Via Serica > Archives > Original Articles
Title REINSTATEMENT OF LONG-DISTANCE INTERNATIONAL TRADE AFTER THE ARAB CONQUEST: THE KHAZAR-ARAB PARTNERSHIP ON THE SILK ROAD IN THE 9-10th CENTURIES
Author FARDA ASADOV
Volume Inaugural Issue
Pages pp. 33~50 (all 18 pages)
Publication Date December, 2016
Keyword Arabs, Khazars, Silk Road, Rus, ar-rahdaniyya merchants, Trans-Caspian trade
Abstract The article studies the new situation in international long distance trade after the emergence of new superpower -Arab Caliphate - in Eurasian overland tracks of the Great Silk Road. The stages of Arab advancement along trade routes and outcomes of their contestation with the strong tribal confederations of Turkic nomads in Central Asia and the Caucasus are highlighted. A special focus is made upon the relationship of Arabs with Khazar Turks who have endured severe clashes with strongest army of the time in the region. Khazar kingdom survived and even expanded its control over the tracks of international trade in the western part of Eurasia. The research describes the way how trade partnership between Arabs and Turks was shaped in the aftermath of military clashes. Existing scholarly views on the role of Khazar in Silk Road are reviewed and unattended evidence of Arab sources are involved to support concluding points that Khazar state managed to consolidate various actors for maintenance of international trade such as so called Rus warriors and merchants in the west of Volga, nomadic tribes in Eurasian steppes, and Jewish trading gild named ar-rahdaniyya in Arab sources. It is asserted that Khazar state since the second half of 9th century through its decline in mid l0th century not only served as transit space for goods of exporting countries but also exported goods of its own crafts and natural resources.
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